Ski Boot Size Chart & Mondopoint Size Guide

Ski Boot Size Chart & Mondopoint Size Guide (with Sizing Tips)


At Carv, our digital ski coach lives in your boot, so we spend a lot of our time talking about ski boot fit with skiers all over the world. We know there’s nothing more important than getting the fit right!

Carv is tracking turns and guiding the improvement of thousands of skiers across the world, so we also know the importance of efficient weight transfer from your body to the ski to help you learn faster- this pressure and motion transfer is exactly what we measure to give you real-time audio coaching.

Our ski boot size guide and mondo point size chart will help you navigate the treacherous world of ski boot sizing. Check out the ski boot size guide and read below for our guide to get your ski boot sizing just right.

Our number one piece of advice is to always visit a ski boot fitter as they can help you find the right brand to fit your foot shape as well as the right sized boot.

Boot size close up

Great fit, happy feet, quicker skiing development.

Ski boot size guide

This ski boot size guide is based on mondopoint (see below for how to find your exact mondopoint).

Skiers who are sizing their boots can either aim for a comfort fit - ideal for a leisure skier who will ski mainly piste, or a performance fit- for someone sizing tighter to get more control in multiple types of terrain.

If in doubt, go for a performance fit as it is easy to stretch tight points in the boot with a boot fitter, but impossible to shrink a boot that is too big!

Ski boot size chart

Mondopoint (Comfort Fit)

Mondopoint (Performance Fit)

US Size Mens

US Size Womens

UK Size

European Size

22 / 22.5

21 / 21.5

3.5

4.5

3

35.0

22 / 22.5

22 / 22.5

4

5

3.5

35.5

23 / 23.5

22 / 22.5

4.5

5.5

4

36.5

23 / 23.5

23 / 23.5

5

6

4.5

37.0

24 / 24.5

23 / 23.5

5.5

6.5

5

38.0

24 / 24.5

24 / 24.5

6

7

5.5

38.5

25 / 25.5

24 / 24.5

6.5

7.5

6

39.0

25 / 25.5

25 / 25.5

7

8

6.5

40.0

26 / 26.5

25 / 25.5

7.5

8.5

7

40.5

26 / 26.5

26 / 26.5

8

9

7.5

41.0

26 / 26.5

26 / 26.5

8.5

9.5

8

42.0

27 / 27.5

26 / 26.5

9

10

8.5

42.5

27 / 27.5

27 / 27.5

9.5

10.5

9

43.0

28 / 28.5

27 / 27.5

10

11

9.5

44.0

28 / 28.5

28 / 28.5

10.5

11.5

10

44.5

29 / 29.5

28 / 28.5

11

12

10.5

45.0

29 / 29.5

28 / 28.5

11.5

12.5

11

45.5

29 / 29.5

29 / 29.5

12

13

11.5

46.0

30 / 30.5

29 / 29.5

12.5

13.5

12

47.0

30 / 30.5

30 / 30.5

13

14

12.5

47.5

31 / 31.5

30 / 30.5

13.5

14.5

13

48.0

What is mondopoint?

Mondopoint is an international sizing system which relates to your foot length in cm.

Place your foot on a piece of paper (no shoes or socks) up to the edge and bottom of the paper (bottom corner).

Draw a line at the top of your foot and also at the widest point (your big toe knuckle).

Measure from the base of your heel (bottom of the sheet of paper) to the mark you made at the tip of your toe in a straight line in cm. That’s your mondopoint.

Mondopoint sizes have half sizes, but the size of the shell doesn’t change between a 25 and a 25.5 - it is the same shell.

What is last width?

Measure from the edge of the paper to mark you made for the widest point. That is your ‘last width’ to help you find the right brand. Different brands usually fit different foot widths.

  • If you have narrow feet, we recommend lasts ranging from 97mm up to 100mm.
  • If your feet medium width feet, go for a boot between 100mm and 102mm.
  • If you have wide feet, you’ll find boot lasts over 102mm may fit you better.
Boot size infographic

The big rule is ... if in doubt between two shell sizes (e.g. 26 and 25.5) go for the smaller of the two sizes.

The Carv Mondopoint Fit

Carv is designed to fit in almost every ski boot. We have 3 sizes that accommodate a range of Mondopoint sizes. Find your perfect fit below:

SizeMondopointUKUS MensUS WomensEurope
D22.0-24.54-6.55-7.55.5-8.536.5-40
E25.0-27.57-9.58-10.59-1240.5-44
F28.0-30.510-12.511-13.512.5-15.544.5-47.5
Carv ski boot fit guide

How to get ski boot sizing right first time

A good boot fitter will talk you through the following factors to get the best recommendation:

1. Think about the level of your skiing

Do you ski for fun, mainly on groomers (in which case, go with our size guide) or are you a competitive skier, or skiing a lot of specialist terrain (in which case you'll want to push your boot fit and stiffness/flexibility to the limits).

2. Work out how much control you need

The tighter your boots, the more control you will have over your skis. A racer will work with a specialist fitter to get the tightest fit they can without pain

To dial this in, put your bare foot into the empty shell and push your foot forward until your toes touch the front.

  • For an intermediate comfort fit you should be able to fit no more than two fingers between your heel and the back of the boot.
  • For a general intermediate performance fit you should only be able to squeeze 1 finger in that space.

A looser fit can be more comfortable in the shop, but can cause huge problems in the slopes.

Be aware that most people buying boots without a boot fitter will almost always buy a boot that’s too big.

3. Not all feet are the same size and shape

The main thing to get right is the mondopoint length, then a good bootfitter can adjust the boot by heating it up and putting spacers onto the shell to loosen any tight points, moulding it to your individual foot size.

4. The shape of your footbed

Do you need custom arches?

In general, most people benefit from custom footbeds to optimise the way your knee and ankle joints flex laterally as you bend your knees in a skiing position.

The great news is Carv insoles work just as well, if not even better with custom footbeds as your weight and pressure transfer is more efficient.

5. Are you a narrow or wide fit (called the ‘last’)

Different brands suit different last widths, go chat to a boot fitter to get their recommendation.

  • If you have narrow feet, we recommend lasts ranging from 97mm up to 100mm.
  • If your feet medium width feet, go for a boot between 100mm and 102mm.
  • If you have wide feet, you’ll find boot lasts over 102mm may fit you better.

6. Your weight and ski aggression

Heavier or more aggressive skiers need stiffer boots…

  • Casual male skier: 80-110.
  • Aggressive male skier: 120+
  • Casual female skier: 60-80
  • Aggressive female skier: 80+

7. The kind of skiing you’ll do

Certain boot brands are better for skiing freestyle, piste, racing or backcountry. If you're buying for these technical areas, you'll already know to see a good fitter ;).

Don't just pick the one that you like the look of…

  • Make sure you pick the best boot for function not form
  • Remember boots are more flexible in the warm of the shop and stiffen up in the cold mountain air - factor this into your stiffness selection and use our guide above.
  • Take your Carv unit into the boot fitter to ensure a good fit - You can put it in during the moulding process (after the oven) to ensure a great fit with Carv.
  • It helps to be able to return to your fitter after 1-2 days of use to identify any areas for tweaking after your first fit - do this at home or in the mountains - don't leave it for your big ski trip, only to battle through agony for a week...
  • Get custom insoles to ensure efficient power transfer into the ski - they can significantly help with postural correction and improving your technique

N.B. Carv's digital ski coach works with custom boots and custom insoles as well as stock ones.

Carv technology in ski boot

Common ski boot sizing problems and solutions

1. My feet get cold

This is commonly caused by sizing that’s too small. Your feet get cramped, lose blood flow and often get cold as a result.

SOLUTION: Resize the boot either with careful ‘punching’ where the shop will stretch the material, go to a boot fitter or they’ll recommend a new size.

2. My feet bruise or are sore

This is commonly caused by boots that are tight in certain places on your foot and the pressure is bruising your feet.

SOLUTION: Visit a good boot fitter to ‘punch’ the section of your boot that causes a pinch point.

3. My shins hurt when I ski

Your boots are almost certainly too big allowing your shin pressure to move off the tongue of the boot as your feet slide around inside the shoe.

As you ski, your shins compensate for changes in your centre of gravity by contracting (especially if you are skiing with your weight backwards).

This causes shin muscle inflammation as it is quite a delicate muscle and you get ‘shin-bang’ – your boot pressure rubs on your shin inflamed muscles.

SOLUTION: You'll need to go to a boot fitter. Gel pads, extra socks, skiing with ibuprofen - we've tried it all. Your boot is too big and no pharmacy can fix that.

4. My feet and ankles move sideways when I roll my skis

Your boots may be too wide which means that you can’t roll your ski efficiently or direct your pressure into the ski effectively.

This inefficient weight transfer will slow your progress and lead to feeling out of control.

SOLUTION: This one is very hard to fix as boots cannot be 'shrunk'.

5. My feet arches feel cramped

You may not be putting on your boots correctly, leading to over-tightening of the straps in some sections and unnecessarily crushing your feet.

SOLUTION: How you put on your boot has a big impact! Start to clip yourself in from the bottom clips and work your way up. The second clip from the top is the most important one as it holds your ankle in place. Keep your boot slightly looser for the first run as your feet and the boots adjust then notch it up!

Your boots are one of the most important parts of your whole skiing experience. You just have to have one bad day to know what this feels like!

Take the time to get the fit right for your foot shape and skiing style - and your skiing with thank you!

Ski boot sizes in snow